SDITS12 Session: "ITIL 2011: Any the wiser?"

2011 - Does anyone care?

Having gained my ITIL® V3 Foundation Certification before the new ITIL 2011 updates, I was really keen to hear this key-note seminar, at the recent Service Desk & IT Support Show 2012.

There was small gathering for the post-lunch session, and the assembled panel certainly did not lack experience.

Roy Illsley, Ovum, led the panel discussions, and was joined on stage by Ben Clacy, Chief Executive of itSMF UK, Don Page, CEO of the Marval Group, and Sven Strassburg, IBM.

Most people in the room seemed to be using at least some level of ITIL in their organisation, but as to the specific nuances between ITIL V3 and 2011, well that was anyone’s guess.

Something that I had not been aware of, raised by Don Page, was that the advent of ITIL 2011 was also supposed to bring a lot of complementary material, but none has materialised.

A quick check on the official site still has ITIL v3 complementary material, and indeed I managed to snaffle a selection of “Little ITIL” books that were being handed out free, because people are clearing stock for the new versions.

The view from itSMF was: “Just do the bits you want to.”

And there we started to diverge.

The Business Benefits

A question from the floor was around the thorny topic of how to sell the benefits of ITIL to the business.

It is a valid response to say that the business SHOULD be taking an interest on what it is paying out for.

But I am not entirely sure that answered the question, and the conversation then seemed to sit in the IT/Business separation arena.

OK – so we got the business bought in – does my new tool make me coffee?

 “A fool with a tool is still a fool.”

At this point I rather hoped we might start to venture into something I believe in quite strongly in that the ITSM processes in particular should always be the fuel that drives the Service Management tool engine.

But alas the topic stayed on fairly esoteric grounds.

A very valid point, again from Don Page, came in response to query about whether it was time “IT” was dropped from ITIL.

He believed, however, to do that would maybe dilute the content so much as to make it unworkable.

Sven Strassburg gave examples where ITIL was maybe being used to drive processes in nuclear power plants, or aircraft.

  • There was a quick wrap up where we just came back to the same points – adaptable to environments, check.
  • Something to help put structure around processes? Check.

So … what IS ITIL 2011?

It is apparently much improved, but I will make that investment in the books and will see for myself.

What I want to know more about, though, is exactly what complementary material should have materialised with the new version.

As part of my role at The ITSM Review, I want to run an article looking at what ITIL information is out there (and more importantly of actual use to people) ahead of doing courses/gaining certification.

What is it that we are missing?

Does anyone care?

The people currently on a whole heap of ITIL related groups on Linked In care a lot about this!

Which version do I need?

Can I get by with the old V3 for the new exams?

I think it is safe to say that for those taking the new exams, they will have to be at least aware of the differences with older versions that they may have access to, and newer material, for the sake of terminology in the exam.

Is there a quick way round this?

Not as far as I can see.

Start making friends with people who can help you plan for training

Look for helpful material out on the web specifically on ITIL 2011

Are you, Ros, any the wiser?

As an analyst, with experience mainly around the Service Lifecycle, I knew coming into the show that I would need to get up close and personal with ITIL 2011.

As someone with a solution architect background, I have seen projects flounder without due thought around how this is sold, but in my past life have been too low down the food chain to influence those kinds of discussions.

But at its very essence – ITIL is still an adoptable and adaptable set of guidelines.

My view, therefore, is as it was before.  Just needs an update!

For more information on the specific updates, please refer to ITIL Publication Updates

Knowledge12 Review: "Digital natives are spending more time in the feed"

Aprill Allen, Fred Luddy & Breed Lewis in New Orleans for #Know12
Aprill Allen, Fred Luddy & Breed Lewis in New Orleans for #Know12

This review has been contributed by Aprill Allen.

Collaboration and automation were the themes of the Knowledge12 event, ServiceNow’s user conference, which was held in the newly reopened Hyatt Regency in New Orleans from the 15-17 May.

CEO, Frank Slootman, opened the event with a packed keynote session. Announcing the move to a high availability architecture, with a secondary, fully-redundant data centre, and the intention to bring IPO soon (NYSE:NOW), Slootman sees the cloud-based software solution evolving to “touch things instead of people”.

Slootman also gave a nod to the rise in the use of social software in the workplace. Digital natives, in particular, are spending more time in the Live feed (ServiceNow’s activity stream) and less time with email. Will ServiceNow succeed in displacing email altogether? Not on it’s own, but it’s certainly claiming to be part of the movement to do so. But what I can see is ServiceNow shaking up an industry that’s been moving at glacial pace for quite some time. Traditional vendors are reconsidering their offerings and partnerships, while ServiceNow plans to displace the legacy providers when organisations start seeking consolidation and globalisation of their IT management systems.

Through a show of hands, the audience revealed ServiceNow’s PaaS delivery isn’t limited to just IT service management, either. Around 10% are using the platform to develop non-IT solutions as well, one of which—a swing band management system—was nominated for this year’s Innovation of the Year.

It was Fred Luddy’s keynote on day two of the conference that everyone had been waiting for, though. The 2000-strong audience watched with a quiet intensity while ServiceNow founder and chief product offer, Luddy, showed live demonstrations of upcoming functionality, including the collaborative ability Slootman had described the previous day, coming in the next release (Berlin). The new feature allows for the capture of activity stream conversation inside an incident report, providing faster case management than what purely form-based systems allow. This excites me, not just because of the sheer convenience, but because this is where I want to see knowledge management going. This is the kind of paradigm shift knowledge management really needs.

Luddy then went on to demonstrate the “power of the platform” by building a business application in six minutes—a feat he passionately believes anyone should be able to do without the need for coding skills. The calling card of the future Calgary release will be “regular people making meaningful apps.”

Knowledge12 might be over, but delegates, partners, employees and others have left energised. If not from the keynotes, then certainly from the many breakout sessions and labs across the week.

Were you at Know12? What sessions blew your mind and what do you intend to change in your workflow as a result?

This review has been contributed by Aprill Allen. Image used with permission from Macanta Consulting.

Service Desk and IT Support Show 2012 – All in all a good two days.

Diversified Communications reported a 13% increase in attendance

Just before taking up my new role here as an Analyst for The ITSM Review, I was lucky enough to be given the chance to come to this show as preparation for the task ahead.

Certainly on the second day, in our London “drought”, the shelter from the torrential rain provided by exhibitors was interesting, perplexing, and at times irritating, thankfully not in equal measure.

 A Commercial Success

Diversified Business Communications UK reported an impressive 13% increase in visitors for the Service Desk & IT Support Show, held last month, heralding a success as its new owners.

The two-day show drew 4,495 ITSM and IT support professionals from thousands of leading UK and European business organisations, over 24 and 25 April 2012.

“The reaction to the show this year has been incredible,” said event manager Laura Venables.

From visitors to exhibitors, from sponsors to speakers, everybody gained real value from being involved and we’re delighted that it was a complete success.”

The Foot-soldier’s view

It was an interesting two days for me, leading into my new role as an Analyst for The ITSM review mainly because it has been a while since I have been to any technical conference shows like this.

Back in my early days we graduates would all gallop gleefully around the big exhibitions at the NEC, and we were allowed, as it gave us a good chance to learn those all important networking skills.

Also, we weren’t ‘useful’ yet; once you get established in client projects, these jaunts soon disappear from the diary.

It is not as easy as it looks to just launch into conversations with people, even if they ARE trying to sell you something.

For this role in particular, I have to strike a balance between getting information, and giving some kind of perception that they will get anything other than an independent review, should we ever choose to do one.

Of course, it has been amazing for putting faces to some of the great-and-the-good names of Linked In group leaders, providing me with hopefully some good material for my ITSM Review articles.

Review

It would be unfair to base my review on my tired legs, and worn out stand-staffers fed up of smiling, so it’s best to round up my experiences based on the second morning.

  • For the most part, exhibitors are keen to greet with the words “are you looking to invest in a new [insert offering here],” and some seem a little disappointed if they find out you are Press.
  • Others see it as an opportunity to find out if they can send you more stuff.

There have been a couple of disappointments though.

  • One vendor seemed uninterested to the point of: “here’s our literature, email if you have questions.”
  • One key ‘Best Practice’ organisation was not really capable of giving me their three minute elevator pitch and finally just resorted to suggesting I read their website, or maybe come to an event.
  • My pet peeve is where you are having a conversation with someone and suddenly they spy a more established customer and bellow across at them in the “old pals” style with delightful in-jokes and joshery – plain rude, in my opinion.

Conspicuous by their absence

Perhaps more confusingly, some of the biggest players in the ITSM field were not here.

IBM, for example, have a SaaS ready model for their IBM Tivoli Service Request Manager suite, yet they were at Infosec show next door, but not here, with a product that focuses on Service Desk, Incident, Problem and Change Management etc.

Meanwhile in one of the larger displays, BMC are proudly announcing to anyone and everyone about their ability to appeal to any size of market.

The giveaway chart

Now, young or old, a vital part of any conference is the amount of freebies you can get!

Herewith, my run down of what I got!

  • The boys from Service Now won my heart with coffee, jellybeans, a metal pen and an iPad stylus.
  • Followed by the ITIL Training Zone with a nifty plastic card holder (handy for hassled commuter travel cards especially!).
  • Pink Elephant were promoting their latest facilitation offering, looking at Attitude, Behaviour, Culture (ABC) and bravely gave away their ABC decks of cards.  I say bravely, because the cards on their own are amusing, but the value is the workshop that fits around it, and it’s a subject I intend to dig into for The ITSM Review.
  • BMC had a little plastic dancing/boxing man, which was cute but really served no purpose other than to set up to two of them and watch them fight to their plastic death.
  • Axios gave away the smelliest plastic bags but maybe I should thank them as it meant no-one was keen to stand too close in the rush hour tube journey.

Best Value Add

Some stands gave away content on USB memory sticks – especially vital if you want to demo ITSM up in the clouds.

Looking at these purely in the context of my new role, these were the best prizes of the lot.

Will I do this all again next year?

All in all, for me anyway, it was a good two days, and something I see myself doing more and more.

Having worked largely in the enterprise solution space, and rarely having implemented in small-scale projects, it was especially interesting to stop in on some of the less ostentatious stands.

I look forward to testing out a number of demos, getting started with a cycle of Operational Assessments and Product Reviews.

But right now, I would settle for a comfy pair of slippers to rest my tired feet.

HDI2012 vs. SDITS12 on Twitter

I’ve been playing about with some Twitter tools recently and thought I would analyze the two big ITSM events this week: The HDI Conference and Expo in Orlando, Florida, USA and The Service Desk and IT Support Show in London, UK.

I appreciate twitter is not the most perfect mechanism for measuring sentiment at conferences – but I believe it provides a good indication of conversations and interests. In the run up to attending SDITS I noticed a growing number of ITSM practitioners joining twitter (as opposed to consultants and vendors) – so in theory fewer product led conversations.

Key Findings

  • What an enormous reach these events have outside the conference, both in terms of eyeballs and geographical reach.
  • Top topics from the UK appear to be BYOD and Social Media (more on this here)
  • Top topics from the US appear to be SocialIT with ManageEngine’s Flashmob also making a bit of a splash.
  • I would be interested to know how these subjects compare to your own view of topics at the conferences

Head to Head

HDI Conference & Expo

Service Desk and IT Support Show

Hashtag

#HDI2012

#SDITS12

Twitter accounts using the hashtag *

173,553

102,443

Exposure *(Twitter Impressions)

956,945

941,859

Highest Exposure *

@RoyAtkinson (288K)

@OvumICT (182K)

#SDITS12 ACTIVITY
#HDI2012 ACTIVITY
#SDITS12 TOP HITTERS
#HDI2012 TOP HITTERS
#HDI2012 SUBJECTS
#SDITS12 SUBJECTS
#SDITS12 MAP (%)
#HDI2012 MAP (%)

UK IT Conference Season Starts With Service Desk & IT Support Show

Laura Venables "Our 2012 line-up of big name exhibitors and illustrious expert speakers has already generated a lot of positive feedback from pre-registered visitors"

Spring has sprung and the IT conference season engine for 2012 has officially started. Actually, Las Vegas and Orlando got going in January/February, but at least we’re civilised enough to wait until the clocks go forward before we dust off our conference venues.

April is special of course as this is the month that we see the Service Desk & IT Support Show return to London’s Earls Court from the 24-25 April, with over 80 suppliers demonstrating 250+ products and services.

This is the UK’s biggest showcase for the IT Service Management and IT support industry and this year the central exhibition will also benefit from a comprehensive two-day free education programme, which combines eight keynotes, 40 seminars, breakfast briefings and roundtable discussions.

New Faces

A full exhibitor list is available here. Looking over the attendees we can see that there are plenty of the “usual suspects” and that’s always a good thing. Even better is the news that there will also be nearly twenty completely new faces taking part this year.

New names at the show include:

“The support from the industry this year, as always, has been fantastic. Our 2012 line-up of big name exhibitors and illustrious expert speakers has already generated a lot of positive feedback from pre-registered visitors,” commented event manger Laura Venables. “I’ve been working on the show for five years now and it’s a testament to its continuing success that, with less than two weeks to go, we’re still getting significant exhibitor interest from some top ITSM providers.”

Further info: http://www.servicedeskshow.com/

University of Exeter Students Choose Twitter for IT Support

Given the choice, University of Exeter Students Opted to Receive IT Support Updates via Twitter

The itSMF held their UK South West & South Wales Regional meeting at the University of Exeter this week.

The theme of the day was processes and toolsets with a big emphasis on member interaction and discussion.

In a nutshell: A good day. Recommended.

Two presentations really stood out for me during the day. Firstly Deborah Pitt, Configuration Manager at Land Registry Information Systems in Plymouth, gave a compelling talk on how she managed to convince various IT teams within Land Registry to buy-in to their CMDB. In short, Deborah recalled her strategy of badgering, evangelising and more badgering.

Winning Friends and Implementing CMDBs

Deborah shared with us that she increased engagement and adoption with the CMDB by farming out responsibility for configuration items to various IT teams. For example, the team responsible for management of blackberry devices were assigned ownership of Blackberry data within the CMDB, a great strategy for building confidence in the system and getting users to let go of their precious excel sheets.

“Although process and tools have both been important in getting buy in from consumers and owners of the data that goes into the CMDB, another, often overlooked factor has been a major plank of getting the message across.   This is building successful, communicative relationships with both consumers and owners.  Through selectively targeting the audience and tailoring the message, Land Registry have been able to build enthusiasm for CMDB, such that there is now a widespread take up of CI use and ownership.” Deborah Pitt, Land Registry.

Bring Your Own Pot Noodle?

However, for me the most interesting talk of the day came from the hosts: Zach Nashed who runs the IT Helpdesk at the University of Exeter.

Zach shared how the IT support team at the University were coping with the changing demands of students. It was interesting to hear of the changing attitudes towards IT support since tuition fees were abolished. Since students will be paying £9K per annum out of their own pocket from 2012, this was beginning to translate into higher expectations and demands of IT support (e.g. If I’m paying £9K a year to study here I’m not paying extra for printing).

The IT team are also under increasing pressure to provide 24/7/365 IT services for multiple devices per student. For example students are arriving on campus with a laptop, tablet and phone with all flavours of platforms and expecting instant compatibility and high-speed ubiquitous WIFI access.

Fish Where The Fish Are

To provide higher levels of support at the University and align closely with current requirements Zach and his team hold focus groups with students. As a result the University has begun to explore Twitter as an IT support communication channel. When given the option, students at the University chose Twitter as their preferred update mechanism.

I think this is an important point for anyone considering implementing social channels into their support infrastructure. When considering implementation with a particular channel we need to consider:

  1. Do our customers actually use this social media channel?
  2. And do they want to hear from us when they are using it? (Zach noted that although students spent a great deal of time on Facebook their preferred update mechanism was Twitter)

If students of today are recruits of tomorrow then this initiative paints a picture of IT Support in 2015.

The University of Exeter are a long term Hornbill customer and are exploring a module from Hornbill specifically for twitter integration. Want to know how they get on? Follow them here.

Event Listing: Service Catalogues & Service Portfolios Seminar, itSMF UK, 18th April, Solihull

National Motorcycle Museum, Solihull

What?

itSMF UK Seminar – Service Catalogues & Service Portfolios

“Service catalogue, service portfolio and service level management are the essential elements of the relationship between IT and the business.  Without these processes in place, it is increasingly difficult to define what IT services are available to the business and on what basis.

But the relationship between service catalogues and service portfolios is often poorly understood, and this can lead to confusion and misunderstanding. This seminar explains how these concepts inter-relate, and helps attendees to build a solution that suits their specific business needs. “Problem management is often the most under used process, and is described by some as the “If we only have the time” process. In reality it is a process that if used correctly adds real value to the business, and supports all of the other service management processes. To get there, there is a need to invest both time and resource – the very things that problem managers have little of.”

When?

  • Wednesday 18th April 2012, 9am – 4pm

Where?

Who?

  • itSMF UK

Agenda

  • Service catalogue – all things to all people?Not only is the service catalogue a way to orientate your organization and processes around services, it is also a user facing service itself. This is Unilever’s experience of delivering a user-friendly catalogue that is part of improved customer satisfaction. ~ Andrew Davies, Unilever
  • Unlocking the potential of service portfolios and service catalogues, and measuring the right thing This presentation will destroy some myths, make you think differently, and give you the tools to continually improve both IT and the business by integrating portfolios, catalogues and measures. ~ Kevin Holland, UK Public Sector Consultant.
  • Magic wand session: Service catalogues and service portfolios in your organizationTake part in one of our interactive round table discussions, led by Dr Don Page of Marval, and discuss the answers to some key questions concerning service catalogue and service portfolio implementation. ~ Don Page, Marval
  • The service portfolio – the new tool in your service management toolset Just when you have finally understood the concept of the service catalogue and managed to produce a useful addition to your service management toolset, along comes ITIL v3 and the service portfolio. What is it, how does it help us? This presentation will give you some answers. Rob Young, Fox IT

Further Info…

Image Credit

Review: itSMF Problem Management Seminar [Chelsea Football Club]

Steve White, Kepner Tregoe, Engaging the Audience at Chelsea
Steve White, Kepner Tregoe, Engaging the Audience at Chelsea

The UK itSMF hosted a popular Problem Management seminar this week.

Around 100 itSMF members met at Chelsea Football Club to learn about ‘Proactive Problem Management’ from a variety of industry specialists.

Firstly, a quick summary of the sessions (Football Clichés A Go-Go):

FOX IT – GENTLE STRETCHES TO WARM UP

John Griffiths from Fox IT explored the human elements of problem management, the communication channels that exist between incident capture and problem resolution and the interpretation and translation that must happen via the service desk.

SERVICENOW – OWN GOAL

In many ways this event felt a little like a ServiceNow user group – but when the SaaS vendor took centre stage to deliver some thought leadership we were delivered an undiluted sales pitch.

I’ve had the pleasure of meeting David D’Agostino before and know him to be clever, funny and articulate – so I had high expectations for this session. This was an opportunity missed – The itSMF need to be brutal with their editorial – in the end it’s the vendor who came off worst.

KEPNER TREGOE – THE CROWD ARE ON THE PITCH…

A great session from Steve White at Kepner Tregoe. Steve hosted an interactive whiteboard session on defining proactive problem management. For me and for the other delegates I spoke to this was the highlight of the day. More like this please itSMF! It would have been interesting to perhaps walk through some real life scenarios and discuss options with the audience using this open forum approach.

PINK ELEPHANT – A HEARTY PERFORMANCE

Unfortunately I missed parts of Vawns Guest’s session but from what I saw and feedback from others Vawns gave a passionate lesson on the relationship between incident, problem and availability management.

OASIS HEALTHCARE – END-TO-END ACTION

This was an interesting case study from Mike Evans from ITS and Rich Starkey from Oasis Healthcare.   The double act provided a before and after picture of progress at Oasis Healthcare, a network of over 200 UK dental practices. It was also great to see an organization sharing business benefits and return on investment for their project.

Is Honesty The Best Policy?

An interesting point was made during one of the sessions regarding honesty with problems – i.e. do we tell the customer we’re experiencing a problem?

There were mixed views on this – do we keep our problems to ourselves for fear of the organization using it against us or do we openly admit that, we’re human, mistakes happen and we’re doing everything we can to resolve it?

In my view – How an organization answers this question gives a good insight into their culture and maturity. I’m sure that at times there are perfectly good reasons for keeping schtum – but I think honestly is the best policy.

Whether you are trying to run trains on time, hosting services in a datacenter or delivering fruit and vegetables– a bit of honesty from your provider strengthens the relationship and gives the impression that you are not just being fobbed off.

Wrap-Up

Overall I would definitely recommend this seminar, some interactive sessions with lots of questions. I look forward to attending future itSMF seminars this year (further info here).

Finally, Colin Rudd asked the audience if there was interest in rejuvenating the Problem Management SIG and the response was positive – contact itSMF to learn more.

Photo

Event Listing: Proactive Problem Management, itSMF UK, 8th Feb, London

Chelsea Football Club
Chelsea Football Club

What?

itSMF UK Seminar – Proactive Problem Management

“Problem management is often the most under used process, and is described by some as the “If we only have the time” process. In reality it is a process that if used correctly adds real value to the business, and supports all of the other service management processes. To get there, there is a need to invest both time and resource – the very things that problem managers have little of.

“This seminar is targeted at problem managers who want to improve their approach and understanding of problem management by adopting a more proactive focus in order to deliver more successful outcomes”

When?

  • Wednesday 8th February 2012, 9am – 4pm

Where?

Who?

  • itSMF UK

Agenda

  • ‘Incident, problem and availability management – the new holy trinity’ Vawns Guest, Pink Elephant
  • ‘IT service delivery from a third party – jumping from reactive to proactive’ Mike Evans, ITS & Rich Starkey, Oasis Healthcare
  • ‘Are you communicating problems or having problems communicating?’ John Griffiths, Fox IT
  • ‘Is the cloud a ‘problem’ for problem management?’ David D’Agostino, Service-Now.com

Further Info…

Vendor Booths at Conferences Need a Shakedown

Vendor Booths at Conferences Need a Smack Down
Time for a new model?

I was lucky enough to attend the first day of the ITSMF conference in London yesterday. Having spent most of the day in the exhibitor lounge I can’t really comment on the speakers and content, but the whole event was very well organized and it seemed to have a great atmosphere, great networking and great people.

I have previously attended this event as a vendor so it was interesting to see the other side of the fence. Getting people to your stand is an age old problem but the disconnect between vendor booths and delegates seems to be getting worse, especially for tool vendors. This is not a criticism of the ITSMF conference per se, but conferences generally.

Exhibitor Booth – A Twenty-Year Old Concept?

The rest of vendor marketing seems to have moved along with the times with the introduction of email, web seminars and to a degree, social media. But with the exception of electronic swipers and polluting hashtag streams – has the conference vendor booth concept really progressed in twenty years?

The ITSMF team did a good job of delivering a compelling agenda with varied content and speakers. But most of the exhibitor lounge seemed to be disconnected from the delegates like awkward boys and girls at a teenage disco. We’re in the same room, we have shared interests but I’m not sure where to start…

In dating terms the current exhibitor booth model is like a nightclub – your luck in finding a suitable date is strongly dependent on serendipity; who is there at the time and who you happen to bump into. Whereas exhibitor booths should be closer to speed dating – aligning customers with problems with pain with solutions.

I don’t claim to have an answer for this issue, but one idea that springs to mind is breaking the traditional vendor hall into themes as chosen by delegates prior to the conference. So for example some key themes might be consumerization of IT, doing more with less / accountability and maturing your operation.

Exhibitors could populate ‘zones’ dedicated to certain subjects and delegates with an interest in that topic could immerse themselves in what the industry has to say, and offer. For exhibitors – If you don’t feel confident speaking about the key concerns of the industry – what are you doing at the conference?

Permission

I believe the disconnect can be boiled down to permission. The marketing guru Seth Godin refers to permission based marketing; the tectonic shift between outbound and inbound marketing. I strongly recommend Seth’s book for anyone trying to grapple with modern marketing, it is very readable and accessible (The much hyped clue-train manifesto remains half-read on my bookcase gathering dust next to ‘A brief history of time’).

Outbound marketing refers to ‘if you throw enough at the wall something will stick’; cold calls, leaflets, advertising. Inbound marketing refers to getting found by prospects and ‘earning their way in’ by providing value.

Let’s start a conversation based on something I know you are interested in, have a brief discussion, then we can both walk away from the show knowing we have something of interest to talk about in the future. I have your permission, a topic of conversation and a common interest. I don’t think swiping my badge in exchange for jelly beans whilst you tell me about your latest release constitutes value.

An intangible part of the conference process is networking, catching up with old colleague in the industry and having a bit of fun. Daft toys , in nothing else, are a bit of fun and good ice breaker. However if I were a marketing manager looking to justify my attendance at such a show it has to be based on hard economics.

These conference are important. Many people in the industry get great value from them. Exhibitor booths are an important part of the financial model of a conference – either the exhibitors need to up their game or the model has to change.